Buddhist – Hellven http://hellven.org/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 18:26:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hellven.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-2-32x32.png Buddhist – Hellven http://hellven.org/ 32 32 Archaeologists amazed by Myanmar’s ancient monument that ‘defies gravity’ | Sciences | News https://hellven.org/archaeologists-amazed-by-myanmars-ancient-monument-that-defies-gravity-sciences-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 12:51:00 +0000 https://hellven.org/archaeologists-amazed-by-myanmars-ancient-monument-that-defies-gravity-sciences-news/ Burma: Buddhists visit precarious monument on top of mountain Kyaiktiyo Pagoda, also known as the Golden Rock, is a well-known Buddhist pilgrimage site in Mon State, Myanmar. It sits on top of Kyaiktiyo Hill (also known as Kelasa Hills or Eastern Yoma Mountains) and sits on the Paung-laung Ridge of the Eastern Yoma Mountains. Shrouded […]]]>

Burma: Buddhists visit precarious monument on top of mountain

Kyaiktiyo Pagoda, also known as the Golden Rock, is a well-known Buddhist pilgrimage site in Mon State, Myanmar. It sits on top of Kyaiktiyo Hill (also known as Kelasa Hills or Eastern Yoma Mountains) and sits on the Paung-laung Ridge of the Eastern Yoma Mountains. Shrouded in clouds, its origins and history offer visitors and pilgrims a tantalizing taste of mystery and mythology.

The boulder itself is 25 feet, precariously poised on the edge of an abyss.

To the human eye it sounds baffling, almost impossible, but to the devoted it is proof of the divine.

Its worshipers believe that the rock remains in balance thanks to the miraculous powers of Buddha.

Between the rock and the hill it stands on, it is actually believed that a lock of the Buddha’s hair is placed, helping him to keep his balance.

Archeology: researchers have been amazed by the precarious balance of the rock for years (Image: GETTY / Youtube / Smithsonian Channel)

Ancient history: Artist's impression of the rock in 1920

Ancient history: Artist’s impression of the rock in 1920 (Image: GETTY)

Few Burmese question the engineering behind the construction and instead devote themselves to the mythology of it.

The more myths and miracles a site is surrounded by, the more important it is to pray there.

Her story and story were explored during the Smithsonian Channel documentary, “Wonders of Burma: Shrines of Gold,” in which the narrator noted her “gravity-defying” nature.

They said, “It is a natural wonder made sacred by stories.”

JUSTIN: Putin accused of increasing energy bill for millions of Britons

Buddhists: Pilgrims revere the rock as a holy place

Buddhists: Pilgrims revere the rock as a holy place (Image: GETTY)

The legend begins with a kingdom a thousand years ago at the bottom of a region called “Upper Mon”.

One day the king met a Buddhist hermit who held a lock of hair inside his so-called Buddha hat and offered it to the king.

In return, the hermit insisted that the hair be encased in a pagoda built on a rock in the shape of his head.

The king had inherited supernatural powers from his father Zawgyi, a skilled alchemist, and his mother, a dragon-serpent naga princess.

DO NOT MISS

NO Fourth Covid Vaccine Needed As New Recall Instructions Given [REPORT]
Mysterious disease outbreak kills 97 as WHO sends to investigate [INSIGHT]
Archaeological breakthrough as “cursed” wreck found after 350 years
[ANALYSIS]

Route: A pilgrim on his way to the pagoda

Route: A pilgrim on his way to the pagoda (Image: GETTY)

Golden Rock: He apparently doesn't realize his precarious position

Golden Rock: He apparently doesn’t realize his precarious position (Image: GETTY)

He enlisted the help of Sakra, the Thagyamin, who found the perfect rock at the bottom of the ocean.

Pulling it from the seabed, he used a boat to transport the boulder and eventually lifted it to the top of the mountain.

After balancing the rock on the mountain, the king built a pagoda at the top and encased the Buddhist’s hair inside.

The boat that was used to transport the rock was also turned into stone, also venerated by pilgrims at a place about 300 meters from the Golden Rock.

Mythology: The rock is shrouded in mystery and mythology

Mythology: The rock is shrouded in mystery and mythology (Image: GETTY)

It is known as Kyaukthanban or stupa pagoda – its literal meaning translates to “the stone boat”.

Another version of the story says that the rock was placed on the hair and the hair helps keep the rock from sliding down the mountain.

And, another states that Buddhist prides impressed the king with his asceticism and thus used his own powers to carry the rock himself to its present place.

At the edge of the abyss: Many legends claim to give the reason why the rock has not yet fallen

At the edge of the abyss: Many legends claim to give the reason why the rock has not yet fallen (Image: Youtube channel / Smithsonian)

The shrine that followed and the history behind it made Mount Kyaiktiyo and the Golden Rock one of the most famous and popular places in the whole country.

While the Golden Rock has become a tourist attraction, between November and March an atmosphere of devotion is observed.

It is here that pilgrims come from all over Myanmar and sing, light candles, meditate and bring offerings to the Buddha.


Source link

]]>
Terrorist threat in Asian countries diminished in 2021, Singapore think tank reports – BenarNews https://hellven.org/terrorist-threat-in-asian-countries-diminished-in-2021-singapore-think-tank-reports-benarnews/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:18:02 +0000 https://hellven.org/terrorist-threat-in-asian-countries-diminished-in-2021-singapore-think-tank-reports-benarnews/ Terrorist threats in countries in Southeast and South Asia declined in 2021, a Singaporean think tank said in its annual threat assessment released this week, noting that movement restrictions linked to COVID-19 had “flattens the curve of terrorism”. There have been fewer terrorism-related incidents in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Bangladesh as governments battled the […]]]>

Terrorist threats in countries in Southeast and South Asia declined in 2021, a Singaporean think tank said in its annual threat assessment released this week, noting that movement restrictions linked to COVID-19 had “flattens the curve of terrorism”.

There have been fewer terrorism-related incidents in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Bangladesh as governments battled the pandemic, according to the Counter Terrorist Trends and Analysis report published by researchers at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies.

In Thailand, in 2021, violent incidents linked to an insurgency in the far south were similar to those in the previous year, the researchers found.

“Ultimately, the 2021 survey underscored the continued imperative for states to respond to the longer-term underlying grievances that fuel violent extremism,” the analysis says.

In Indonesia, the largest country in Southeast Asia, the number of attacks and plots by violent extremist Islamic militant groups has declined in the past two years compared to before the COVID-19 outbreak, according to the report.

The relatively stagnant activities of Jamaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD) in 2020-2021 and the decline in terrorist activities of the Mujahedin in Eastern Indonesia (MIT) in 2021, he said, “can be partly attributed to movement restrictions and higher costs associated with domestic travel due to the pandemic. . “

In 2021, JAD was involved in at least nine incidents, five of which used explosive materials. These included two suicide bombings and a suicide bombing plot, up from 11 incidents the previous year.

Police were the most common target of terrorist incidents in Indonesia, according to the analysis. Other people targeted by Indonesian extremists last year were “civilians, including Christians, as well as mainland Indonesians and Chinese,” according to the report.

Indonesian security forces announced on Tuesday that they had killed Ahmad Gazali, a suspected MIT member, in the mountains of central Sulawesi province, reducing the number of MIT members to just three.

Both MIT and JAD are extremist pro-Islamic State (IS) groups.

Malaysia, Philippines

The analysis specifically linked the COVID-19 pandemic to the decline in terrorist activity in Malaysia last year.

“The movement restrictions brought on by the pandemic that have hampered interstate and international movement have also ‘flattened the terrorism curve’ in Malaysia,” he said.

Authorities made no terrorism-related arrests in Peninsular Malaysia last year, but made around 15 in Sabah between May and September. There were seven arrests in 2020; 72 in 2019; 85 in 2018; 106 in 2017 and 119 in 2016, according to the analysis.

Still, the analysis expressed concern that terrorist threats have moved online.

“Government-imposed lockdowns have forced people to spend more time online, increasing the likelihood that vulnerable people will be exposed to radical ideologies in the cyber realm. Across the region, groups such as IS have stepped up their recruitment and radicalization efforts through social media during the pandemic, ”he said.

Elsewhere, the Armed Forces of the Philippines have praised the resumption of terrorist bases in the southern region of Mindanao.

Nationally, “the number of successful terrorist incidents increased from 134 in 2019 to 59 incidents in 2020 and 17 in 2021, analysts said, defining a successful incident as an attack that injured or killed others. people.

The analysis noted that government-imposed COVID-19 lockdowns were affecting terrorist operations.

“Since they have significantly restricted the movement of the general population, as well as that of terrorists, this made terrorist logistics vulnerable to detection more easily,” he said.

Bangladesh

In Bangladesh in 2021, “there were two failed attacks against four successful in 2020,” the report said, adding that authorities had arrested around 130 terrorist suspects across the country.

Neo-JMB, a pro-Islamic State splinter faction in Jamaat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh, “appeared to target law enforcement, churches, Hindu and Buddhist figures and workers of non-governmental organizations,” according to the to analyse.

He also said that Neo-JMB was seeking to “train all of its members in the production of IEDs,” as well as “chloroform bombs to target buses, classrooms and public places with the aim of killing silently ”.

Thailand

In the insurgent southern border region of Thailand, 423 violent incidents were recorded, leaving 104 dead and 169 injured until November 2021, according to the report. The scale was similar to that of 2020 where 335 violent incidents occurred, killing 116 and injuring 161.

In the Muslim-majority Great South, as the region is known, more than 7,000 people have been killed since separatist groups resumed an insurgency against the Buddhist majority 18 years ago.

Barisan Revolusi Nasional (BRN), the largest separatist group in the Deep South, reduced its militant operations on humanitarian grounds in April 2020 due to the pandemic. The analysis indicates that this has led to a “significant decrease in violence”.

“In 2021, the BRN kept operations at a low level, so as not to worsen the already perilous situation of the inhabitants of the south,” he said.

After avoiding peace talks with government officials in early 2020, BRN joined the efforts negotiated by Malaysia. A source from the government team said the two sides met virtually in 2021 and that the BRN submitted a ceasefire proposal in May, according to the analysis.

“The BRN proposed the creation of an autonomous ‘Patani Darussalam’, in which the Patani people would have the right to design their own educational and economic systems. In addition, their Malay language and identity had to be officially recognized and preserved, ”he said.


Source link

]]>
Prison ministry delivers children’s books giving Buddhism lessons https://hellven.org/prison-ministry-delivers-childrens-books-giving-buddhism-lessons/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:28:39 +0000 https://hellven.org/prison-ministry-delivers-childrens-books-giving-buddhism-lessons/ SPOKANE, Wash. (RNS) – Years before Albert Ramos finished his children’s book about an energetic puppy who learns dog toys don’t bring real happiness, he started writing a letter. In 2010, Ramos, sentenced to five years in prison for murder at Nash Correctional Facility in North Carolina, sent his message to Venerable Thubten Chodron, founder […]]]>

SPOKANE, Wash. (RNS) – Years before Albert Ramos finished his children’s book about an energetic puppy who learns dog toys don’t bring real happiness, he started writing a letter.

In 2010, Ramos, sentenced to five years in prison for murder at Nash Correctional Facility in North Carolina, sent his message to Venerable Thubten Chodron, founder and abbess of Sravasti Abbey in the east. of Washington State.

Ramos had come to know the community through the Abbey Prison Dharma program, which reaches approximately 1,000 prisoners across the United States. The monks of the abbey correspond with the prisoners and send them a quarterly bulletin as well as books on Buddhism. Chodron and others from the abbey also visit prisons when they can and organize a virtual “distance retreat” for around 200 inmates in the winter.

Over time, Ramos began to practice Buddhism, meditate daily, and keep a gratitude journal. He now aims to assist other convicts as a Field Minister through the North Carolina Field Ministers Program. Field ministers work with chaplains to assist people in the prison system with religious issues, drug addiction, childhood trauma, and mental health issues.


RELATED: 24 inmates with bachelor’s degrees in pastoral ministry will serve North Carolina prisons as ministers


“He really took Dharma to heart,” Chodron said. “One of the things about Buddhism that incarcerated guys really get along with is when they hear about the compassion and nature of Buddha, and they can develop compassion for others, and that ‘they have the potential to become a fully enlightened Buddha, ”she said. .

“Ven. Chodron and Sravasti Abbey have helped transform my mind from being depressed and angry to being inclusive, empathetic, compassionate and cheerful,” Ramos said in a written exchange. “It’s amazing the degree of mental transformation a person can go through when they are helped by others in a healthy direction.”

Ramos’ book, “Gavin Discovers the Secret of Happiness”, was published by the Abbey in August. Ramos is already working on a second book, about a dog father who goes to the pound for having committed a crime. Ramos has said he will tackle the feelings children have when a parent is incarcerated.

Chodron, who is originally from California and became a nun in 1977, studied Tibetan Buddhism in India and Nepal under the guidance of the Dalai Lama and other prominent teachers and has served as an ambassador of Buddhism in the West for decades. She has written or co-authored over two dozen Dharma books.

She said she did not intend to work in prison. “But in 1997,” she said, “someone wrote to me and told me he wanted a Buddhist book, so I sent him a book and we started to correspond.”

This prisoner then sent Chodron’s contact details to other prisoners, and she came to view work as a central part of her mission. “When you take the Bodhisattva vow, the larger vow is to become a Buddha for the sake of sentient beings. A big part of your practice is cultivating love and compassion and cherishing others, ”she said. When she founded Sravasti Abbey in 2003, she integrated her prison ministry into the life of the abbey.

In 2019, Chodron co-wrote “Unlocking Your Potential: How To Get Out of Your Own Way,” with Calvin Malone, a (now released) Washington state inmate who had written two books about his experience as a Buddhist in prison.

Two years ago Ramos, wanting to share some of the Buddhist lessons he learned with the children, began writing a short story about Gavin the Dog.

He said he wanted children to learn to be content with what they already have, especially their friendships.

“Children and adults sometimes forget the blessings around us,” Ramos said. “We live in a materialistic culture, which sometimes puts us in a coma-like state, which numbs us with true happiness. Happiness is already within us, we just need to recognize what is really important to us.

He sent a version of his children’s tale to Chodron in the hope that it would be published in the “Dharma Dispatch” newsletter. Chodron thought it could be something more.

“I read it and found it so adorable,” she said.


ARCHIVE: In Washington state, a Tibetan Buddhist nun leads the way for other women


So she sent it back to Ramos for some touch-ups and hired an illustrator and a book designer.

Chodron said his hopes to help get the book published are twofold: to help children understand that taking care of people is more important than material possessions, and to help adults and children be more compassionate to those who are. in prison.

“People in prison are human beings, they have talents, they can contribute to society and we need to do more to support them,” she said. “We shouldn’t think of people for the worst thing they’ve done in their life. Would you like to be known for the worst thing you have done in your life? “


Source link

]]>
North Bay State Assembly race draws 3rd candidate https://hellven.org/north-bay-state-assembly-race-draws-3rd-candidate/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:22:55 +0000 https://hellven.org/north-bay-state-assembly-race-draws-3rd-candidate/ A Sonoma County contractor will participate in the June 7 primary to replace MP Marc Levine. “I want to take the work I’ve done at the community level to another level,” said Steve Schwartz of Sebastopol, who founded the Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative in 2012 and California FarmLink in 1998. Schwartz, 56, executive director of […]]]>

A Sonoma County contractor will participate in the June 7 primary to replace MP Marc Levine.

“I want to take the work I’ve done at the community level to another level,” said Steve Schwartz of Sebastopol, who founded the Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative in 2012 and California FarmLink in 1998.

Schwartz, 56, executive director of the food program, is the first person living outside of Marin to participate in the race.

Marin County Supervisor Damon Connolly and Sara Aminzadeh, a lawyer with the California Coastal Commission, announced in the fall that they would join the race.

Levine, a Democrat from Greenbrae, has decided to forgo the possibility of a sixth and final term in the Legislature to run for the post of state insurance commissioner, a post held by Ricardo Lara, a fellow Democrat. . Levine is nearing the end of his term.

Much of the work Schwartz has done over the past 25 years with leading nonprofits is about producing healthy food.

The Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative aims to connect religious people to a food system through their congregations and to expand the sustainable agricultural movement to improve public policies. The collaboration has fostered the development of community gardens by Buddhist, Christian, Muslim and Jewish congregations.

Schwartz founded California FarmLink with the goal of helping farmers access land and capital. He organized a program to help beginning farmers save money for equipment and assets needed to grow their business. Securing bank capital, FarmLink has matched farmers’ savings three to one.

Schwartz’s work in the area of ​​food production has included working with land trusts. He said training provided by FarmLink in 2009 led the Marin Agricultural Land Trust to add language to their easements requiring development protected lands to continue to be used for agriculture.

Schwartz said he would like some of the money from Measure A to continue to be used to help fund MALT easements.

Schwartz’s father was one of the youngest children to survive the Auschwitz concentration camp. The elder Schwartz grew up on a small farm in Czechoslovakia and arrived in the United States with a suitcase full of food.

“We learned from our father how crucial it is for people to have something to eat,” Schwartz said.

Andy Naja-Riese, Managing Director of the Marin Agricultural Institute, said: “Steve is a truly thoughtful, dedicated and accessible leader who strives to build a better food and agricultural system in the face of growing inequalities in the face of hunger. I am delighted that we have a local organic farmer applying for a position to serve our farmers, food manufacturers and eaters in North Bay.

Schwartz holds a BA in Economics, Politics and Government from the University of Puget Sound and an MA in Public Administration, Intergovernmental Management and Human Resources Management from the University of Southern California.

Schwartz served more than two years in the United States Peace Corps as a community development volunteer.

After Schwartz completed his master’s degree, he spent more than three years working as chief of staff for two members of the State Assembly.

“I have the best training possible to be a member of the Assembly,” said Schwartz. “I was in the room when the agreements were negotiated. I learned how you negotiate a bill and gain the support of committee members to achieve your priorities.

Schwartz has had some experience as an elected official. He served a four-year term on the Gravenstein Union School District Board. The board oversees a K-8 transition school district with an enrollment of approximately 750 students.

Schwartz’s policy proposals extend beyond agriculture. When it comes to addressing the shortage of affordable housing in the state, he said new state laws removing local zoning barriers to new development won’t do the job.

“Just because the state says we need more units doesn’t mean people will be motivated to build the units without the funding they need,” Schwartz said.

One way to provide the necessary funding could be to reduce property taxes for landlords who rent their homes to teachers or other essential workers with low wages, he said.

When asked if he finds the prospect of competing against his two Marin County opponents intimidating, Schwartz noted that 47% of voters in the district are in Sonoma County.

The redistricting of the Assembly District, which was just completed this month, has ruled out the possibility of Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Rogers being a candidate.

“I ended up about 500 feet from the district,” Rogers said.

Regarding Schwartz’s outlook, Rogers said, “Most of what I know of the work he’s done has been more at the state or regional level. I don’t know to what extent this translates into name identification in the district. “

Rogers said Connolly is recognized in the district and Aminzadeh appears to be on the cusp of raising enough funds to advocate for her case with voters.

“The real question is, will Steve be able to raise enough money to tell his story?” Rogers said.

Schwartz believes he will need to raise a minimum of $ 200,000 to be competitive. He declined to say how much he had raised, but said: “I am happy with the progress made so far. We will be able to achieve the goal.


Source link

]]>
Japanese art and the majesty of the sky https://hellven.org/japanese-art-and-the-majesty-of-the-sky/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 03:15:42 +0000 https://hellven.org/japanese-art-and-the-majesty-of-the-sky/ Japanese art and the majesty of the sky Lee jay walker Tokyo modern times In the four Japanese works of art selected in this article, the passage of time is irrelevant. Thus, three artists are from the “past” while the other is from the “now”. However, regardless of the weather, art will continue to create […]]]>

Japanese art and the majesty of the sky

Lee jay walker

Tokyo modern times

In the four Japanese works of art selected in this article, the passage of time is irrelevant. Thus, three artists are from the “past” while the other is from the “now”. However, regardless of the weather, art will continue to create joy, passion, wonder, and other positive aspects for the human eye and heart.

The earliest artwork above is by Tani Buncho (1763-1840), who lived during the Edo period. Buncho belongs to the Bunjinga school of thought. So, like Kameda Bosai, Hanabusa Itcho, Ike no Taiga, Watanabe Kazan, Tomioka Tessai, and others, Buncho was a literate artist. Therefore, Buncho admired traditional Chinese culture although Japan was mostly isolated during the Edo period.

Sakai Hōitsu (1761-1829) also lived during the Edo period. Hōitsu, over time, became a Buddhist monk while teaching young artists. In her delightful triptych above, you can feel a fusion of art, Buddhism, ideas, literature, poetry, and all the passion it generated.

The next artwork above is by contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi from northern Japan. His art draws inspiration from Japanese rinpa art, the Kano School of Art, Dutch art from the Golden Age to the following century, and several individual artists, including LS Lowry, while also creating its own independent landscapes. Utsumi then expresses his thought patterns through the prism of his art. Therefore, you can feel the deep connection between the above amazing artwork and the inspiration that came from the work of Kamisaka Sekka (1866-1942).

Kanzan Shimomura (1873 to 1930) is a famous artistic son of Wakayama. He was born during the Meiji Revolutionary Period and died at the beginning of the Showa period of Japanese history. Therefore, the intervening era, the Taisho period (1912-1926), was more calm and liberal. Despite this, his artwork above is a link to the past.

All in all, despite the passage of time – and the delightful angle of modern contemporary artist Sawako Utsumi – you can feel the richness of nature and continuity.

http://sawakoart.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy his artwork, postcards, bags and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

PLEASE DONATE TO HELP IN TOKYO’S MODERN TIMES

Modern Tokyo News is part of the Modern Tokyo Times group

DONATIONS to SUPPORT MODERN TOKYO TIMES – please pay PayPal and DONATE at sawakoart@gmail.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com Modern Tokyo Times – International News and News from Japan

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/moderntokyotimes/ The Modern Tokyo Times is now on PINTEREST

http://sawakoart.com – Personal website of Sawako Utsumi and Modern Tokyo Times artist

https://moderntokyonews.com Modern Tokyo News – Tokyo News and International News

PLEASE JOIN ON TWITTER

https://twitter.com/MTT_News Tokyo modern times

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE ON FACEBOOK

https://www.facebook.com/moderntokyotimes



Source link

]]>
Tiger Woods: “Bond” film buff, a Buddhist and a stint in the Stanford classroom: Tiger Woods, far from the headlines https://hellven.org/tiger-woods-bond-film-buff-a-buddhist-and-a-stint-in-the-stanford-classroom-tiger-woods-far-from-the-headlines/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://hellven.org/tiger-woods-bond-film-buff-a-buddhist-and-a-stint-in-the-stanford-classroom-tiger-woods-far-from-the-headlines/ Tiger Woods, billed as one of the world’s most talented golfers and one of the popular sporting icons of the 21st century, is now one year older. After nearly ten months of the tragic car accident in which the 46-year-old was seriously injured, he recently returned to the golf course to compete in the PNC […]]]>
Tiger Woods, billed as one of the world’s most talented golfers and one of the popular sporting icons of the 21st century, is now one year older. After nearly ten months of the tragic car accident in which the 46-year-old was seriously injured, he recently returned to the golf course to compete in the PNC father-son championship at the Ritz Carlton.

Paired with his son Charlie, the return of the golf pro has delighted golf enthusiasts. Woods’ triumphant career and eventful personal life have often made headlines. However, there are still some interesting facts about the 46-year-old that you may not know.

To begin with, the name ‘Tiger’ was his nickname, given to him by his father. He was inspired by the comrade in arms and acquaintance of his father, who was popularly called by the same name. Decades later, the world’s most famous tiger is none other than Tiger Woods.

Woods was raised as a Buddhist by his Thai mother, and he actively practiced the religion as a child. Woods practiced meditation and had gone to the temple with his mother. However, the aspect of Buddhism that appeals to him the most is inner growth through spirituality. Woods fell back on his religion after his near-death accident.

Besides his sportsmanship, Woods also has great calligraphy. The golfer loves to write and was a columnist from 1997 to 2011 for Golf Digest Magazine. In 2001, his book ‘How I Play Golf’ sold 1.5 million copies.

Aside from his infamous accident, which resulted in his infidelity being revealed, Woods has previously been arrested for being under the influence of alcohol and suspected of speeding. However, a breathalyzer later revealed he had no alcohol in his body. Woods later said in a statement that he was actually having “an unexpected reaction to prescribed medication.” The golfer, however, took the opportunity to thank the police for doing their duty and apologized.

On the lighter side, Woods is a Bond movie buff. His favorite films include “Caddyshack”, “48 Hours” and of course all the Bond films. His favorite music is mainly that of the group U2 and Boyz II Men. He is also a fan of Janet Jackson.

In 1995, he began studying economics at Stanford University on a golf scholarship and was named “Stanford Male Freshman of the Year”.

The word “Tigerproofing” was introduced into golfing vocabulary because when Woods burst onto the scene, he brought with him a new style of golf. No one before Woods could reach the distance he covered. Many courses had to add yardage to their tees to reduce the advantage of long hitters like Woods, known as “Tigerproofing.”

Woods, who has left an indelible mark on golf courses and in the hearts of his fans, said in an interview last month that a full return to the sport was unlikely for him. “I think something realistic is playing the tour someday, never full time, never again,” said the 46-year-old golfer.


Source link

]]>
China demolishes 99-foot Buddha statue in Drago County https://hellven.org/china-demolishes-99-foot-buddha-statue-in-drago-county/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:18:21 +0000 https://hellven.org/china-demolishes-99-foot-buddha-statue-in-drago-county/ By Choekyi Lhamo DHARAMHALA, December 28: Chinese authorities in Drago County in Tibet’s Kham region reportedly demolished a 99-foot Buddha statue and destroyed 45 huge prayer wheels erected near Drago Monastery, sources cited by Dharamshala-based Tibet Watch said . The report released on Friday said county head Wang Dongsheng was responsible for the demolition, a […]]]>

By Choekyi Lhamo

DHARAMHALA, December 28: Chinese authorities in Drago County in Tibet’s Kham region reportedly demolished a 99-foot Buddha statue and destroyed 45 huge prayer wheels erected near Drago Monastery, sources cited by Dharamshala-based Tibet Watch said . The report released on Friday said county head Wang Dongsheng was responsible for the demolition, a senior official who was also implicated in the widespread destruction of Larung Gar Buddhist Academy.

The massive statue was first built with a financial contribution of 4,000,000 yuan ($ 6.3 million), while 1,800,000 yuan (approximately $ 282,500) was spent on prayer wheels by local Tibetans. settled in the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of Kardze, in the so-called Sichuan Province. . The demolition process took place from December 12 with “military troops massively deployed at the crossroads of its neighborhood to prevent any form of protest”, according to the source.

The rights organization said the statue was officially built with the full approval of local authorities, based on Buddhists’ beliefs that it would prevent famine, war and potential disasters from fire, water, earth and air. Local Chinese authorities, at the time of the demolition, invalidated the construction documents and said that the height of the statue was not allowed nearby.

The bronze Buddha statue was officially completed on October 5, 2015, after consulting with religious figures overseeing plans for the location, time, cardinal direction and arrangement of these activities. “This tragic wave of demolition follows the forced demolition of the nearby Gaden Namgyal Monastic School at the end of October this year. As a result, more than a hundred of its young students were expelled and ordered an immediate return to their homes, ”the report said. The Chinese government had ordered Tibetans to demolish a Tibetan Buddhist school after alleging that the school had “violated” the land use law, and the administration had only three days to vacate the premises.


Source link

]]>
People talk about – https://hellven.org/people-talk-about/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://hellven.org/people-talk-about/ – the explosion that took place in Karachi claimed the lives of more than a dozen people because decades of haphazard growth and disregard for civic codes created death traps across this vast, cluttered city. People say this disaster needs to be fully investigated as the question arises as to why this building was still […]]]>

– the explosion that took place in Karachi claimed the lives of more than a dozen people because decades of haphazard growth and disregard for civic codes created death traps across this vast, cluttered city. People say this disaster needs to be fully investigated as the question arises as to why this building was still standing even though it was built over a rainwater drain (nullah) while d others, perhaps belonging to less influential people, had been demolished by order of the SC.

– the heartwarming social media outcry over intolerance that took place after a worker at a bakery in the cosmopolitan city of Karachi refused to write “Merry Christmas” on a cake purchased by a customer. People say that discriminating against someone on the basis of their religion is a prejudice.

– the bizarre decision by the management of a medical school in Sindh to remove ceiling fans from girls’ homes because two college students were found hanging from fans after they were allegedly raped. People say that instead of having the matter fully investigated, the administration hushed up the whole incident and decided to move on to live fans, from which bribes will be received, while this alleged cover-up will encourage the perpetrators to continue their brutality on campus. .

– the federal government’s plan to hand over control of the education system in Islamabad to the mayor, although they would need to consult education experts and professionals for the improvement of the system. People wonder if the relevant authorities have properly assessed the consequences of this measure given that the mayor is politically appointed and his involvement will only increase political intervention in the education system, further compromising meritocracy.

– statistics on Pakistani prisoners abroad, those condemned to death being quite worrying and which could have been avoided with foresight. People say that while a small percentage of these people have been incarcerated for other crimes, most have been convicted on drug-related charges, so the government and agencies that send citizens abroad for Jobs need to remember that, unlike their home country, drug control in other countries is very strict and carries the death penalty.

– the news that archaeologists have discovered a 2,300-year-old Buddhist temple in Swat. People say that not only should the excavation site be properly protected from narrow-minded vandals, but the items it contains should also be cataloged and kept in a special museum at the site and since Pakistan is a Muslim country with a past Buddhist, but these two are also quite compatible truths that should not be overlooked to appease some negative-thinking fanatics who want to deny our historical heritage.

– the report that Pakistan Chief Justice (CJP) Gulzar Ahmed once again nominated LHC Judge Ayesha A. Malik for elevation as Supreme Court justice. People say that even though this proposal was rejected by some judges and lawyers because they said it ignored seniority rules, it would be a good step, if implemented, to promote a positive image of the country and boost the aspirations of women who pursue male-dominated careers. – IH


Source link

]]>
On nature and human nature https://hellven.org/on-nature-and-human-nature/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 01:42:08 +0000 https://hellven.org/on-nature-and-human-nature/ Being able to identify the evil within is one thing, but what can we do when we see the evil outside of ourselves? Normally we should be supporting the victims, which is really important. But how do we do it? Sometimes we just follow our inside mara, and we become the same as the perpetrator, […]]]>

Being able to identify the evil within is one thing, but what can we do when we see the evil outside of ourselves?

Normally we should be supporting the victims, which is really important. But how do we do it?

Sometimes we just follow our inside mara, and we become the same as the perpetrator, without understanding the condition, the situation in which the act was committed. In trying to save the victim, we choose violence. It is not true wisdom or compassion, and in the end it will create more problems and distractions.

People don’t want to change themselves – they just want to change the world, and then the world becomes chaotic. But the way of Buddha is that you have to change your inner world, your mara first. Only then does the real influence come.

When you transform yourself you want to help others, you want to radiate the peace that you have within yourself to help others. Otherwise, you are missing out on a lot of social work. Based on your interior mara, your social work becomes a weapon to develop your own mara, and the result is more conflict and more fighting. Social justice is important, and Buddha did it out of love and compassion – not out of hate, violence.

We have become very human-centered, not caring about other sentient beings in the world. How should we use the teachings of Buddha, also for other beings?

I think it’s really important to connect with the balance. The world is based on the individual, and as we are the individual, we have to transform our actions according to our limit, our ability. Then the world will change. The problem is when you want to change the world and it doesn’t happen, you give up. We think, “I’m just one person, whatever I do doesn’t affect the world. And then we stopped. If we are too attached and follow violence, then we will destroy the world.


Source link

]]>
Environmentalists turn Buddha stupa prayer flags in Nepal to white for Earth https://hellven.org/environmentalists-turn-buddha-stupa-prayer-flags-in-nepal-to-white-for-earth/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 03:12:35 +0000 https://hellven.org/environmentalists-turn-buddha-stupa-prayer-flags-in-nepal-to-white-for-earth/ From onlinekhabar.com During an event on Saturday, December 18, the iconic and colorful prayer flags of the Buddha Stupa in Nepal were removed and replaced with white flags. Ang Dolma Sherpa, a Buddhist laywoman and entrepreneur, helped run the event. The goal, she says, is to eliminate both synthetic fibers and chemical dyes from the […]]]>
From onlinekhabar.com

During an event on Saturday, December 18, the iconic and colorful prayer flags of the Buddha Stupa in Nepal were removed and replaced with white flags. Ang Dolma Sherpa, a Buddhist laywoman and entrepreneur, helped run the event. The goal, she says, is to eliminate both synthetic fibers and chemical dyes from the widespread activities in the country of producing and using Buddhist prayer flags.

Buddha Stupa, located about 11 km (6.8 miles) northeast of the center of Nepal’s capital, Kathmandu, is Nepal’s largest stupa, some 36 meters (118 feet) tall. It is one of the most sacred pilgrimage sites for Tibetan Buddhists in the country. Since 1979, it has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Typically, it is adorned with prayer flags in yellow, green, red, white, and blue. Increasingly, the flags used there and elsewhere in Nepal have been made of synthetic fabrics.

Panorama of the stupa before the change of flags. From wikipedia.org

“It is the center of Buddhist religious faith, so I think it will send a good message and also spread to other places,” said Chandra Man Lama, chairman of the region’s development committee. by Boudhanath. (Jakarta Post)

According to Sherpa, “The flags we all know and use are made of nylon or synthetic fabric. These flags are burnt and they then harm our environment, leaving a significant carbon footprint. We always talk about climate change; there is a lot of awareness about it; but, now is the time to switch from synthetic prayer flags to biodegradable flags. (Khabar online)

Some of the personalities who have supported Sherpa’s initiative include Nepal’s first female international mountain guide, Dawa Yangzum Sherpa, the Chairman of the Buddha Area Development Committee, Chandra Man Lama, Honorary Consul in Nepal, and the specialist. sustainable tourism and conservation Lisa Choegyal and UNESCO representative in Nepal Micheal Croft.

According to Sherpa, prayer flags in the distant past were mostly white. She prefers to return to white flags for both environmental and economic reasons. “Many have suggested that I use a natural dye. But, natural dyes are expensive. And while I can use it, it does mean the cost to end users is going up as well. And that seemed unfair. I wanted the price to remain minimum, ”she says. (Khabar online)

Sherpa adds, “We are talking about climate change and sustainability. So the use of cotton does that to a certain extent, but we’re not just thinking about the economics. An individual can buy the prayer flags once, for lack of support for local initiative or even for climate concern. But, if the product is expensive, it does not encourage them to buy again and change their behavior.

From onlinekhabar.com

Sherpa, along with her partner Shreesma Shakya, has been working on this event since 2020. Over the months, she says she has garnered a lot of support from Buddhists interested in helping her. “I was very anxious and worried that people would be offended and hurt their religious feeling,” Sherpa said. that I learned from Buddhism and from my family. (Khabar online)

At the Buddha Stupa, the flags are only changed once a year. This means that the whites will be visible until at least December 2022. It is estimated that Nepal’s monasteries alone use some 2.5 million prayer flags per year, making the market very important for a more environmentally friendly option. And while many flags are burnt, causing pollution, Sherpa suggests that cotton flags be buried instead, where they will decompose in a matter of months.

Mountain guide and supporter, Dawa Yangzum Sherpa carried the biodegradable flags on a recent expedition to the 5,630-meter (18,471-foot) summit of Yalung Ri in eastern Nepal. “It is very important that they are biodegradable,” she said. “These prayer flags (sic) and khadas have an invisible impact.” (Jakarta Post)

See more

Buddhist prayer flags turn white i.e. green (Khabar online)
Nepal’s largest stupa transforms into biodegradable prayer flags (Jakarta Post)

Related News from Buddhadoor Global

Nepalese President Bidya Devi Bhandari calls on state to include Buddhist philosophy and Buddha’s teachings in the curriculum
Live-streamed concert for Buddhist Monastery and Convent in Nepal with Norah Jones, Richard Gere, Laurie Anderson and more
Bangladesh finalizes deal to build Buddhist monastery in Lumbini, Nepal
COVID-19 outbreak at Kopan Buddhist monastery and convent in Nepal


Source link

]]>