Spiritual Work – Hellven http://hellven.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:29:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hellven.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-2-32x32.png Spiritual Work – Hellven http://hellven.org/ 32 32 BradfordToday columnist publishes his first book https://hellven.org/bradfordtoday-columnist-publishes-his-first-book/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://hellven.org/bradfordtoday-columnist-publishes-his-first-book/ The book is a collection of works written during the pandemic focusing on loss, growth and hope BradfordToday Columnist Cynthia Breadner has published her first book. In stillness is a collection of spiritual chronicles published throughout the pandemic, focusing on loss, grief, hope and growth. “It feels good, it’s kind of surreal,” she said of […]]]>

The book is a collection of works written during the pandemic focusing on loss, growth and hope

BradfordToday Columnist Cynthia Breadner has published her first book.

In stillness is a collection of spiritual chronicles published throughout the pandemic, focusing on loss, grief, hope and growth.

“It feels good, it’s kind of surreal,” she said of her work. “I’m proud of it.”

Breadner began writing his column for BradfordToday during the pandemic, as a way to help readers work through feelings of loss and grief throughout isolation and lockdown. She is a grief counselor and provides specialized care in spiritually integrated therapies and also works as a long term care chaplain assisting with end of life care for clients and families.

When asked why she decided to publish her own book, she shrugged and said, “I didn’t decide to write a book. I engaged with you and the online community by writing a weekly life column and this compilation has come to life on its own. Life is what we make of it and by making it we write our history.

For over 20 years, Breadner has been formally involved in the Christian community, however, the book is not religiously based, but rather spiritual in nature.

“Spirituality is a connection to that which creates meaning and purpose. Spirituality is the witness of human existence that the soul contemplates and brings back wherever it comes from once the experience is over,” a- she declared.

“We have spent so much time building a religious community that we have lost track of the divine source that is the root of our hearts and souls,” she said. “The very foundation of relationship begins with our connection to the source, the one who breathed life into us grows our nails and inspires the birds to sing. The very foundation of relationship to the divine comes from stories, from the telling of our experiences, sharing our lives together and, a relationship is formed by paying attention to life.

In her work with the dying, she has come to realize over the past few years that people often cry about not making the most of their time.

“The isolation of the past two years has shown us that we need each other in the flesh, in the community and in the gathering to move forward with purpose and meaning. Like a child who has to gorge from candy to sickness to let go, we’ve been soaked in online connection to nausea and it’s time to get back to the local community, in person. It’s time we realize that even if the connection online is here to stay, it’s worth clinging to our humble beginnings as pioneers and builders of our cities.”

She calls the book a “meaning-making manual” to study and finds similarities in the lives of others.

“It’s a testament to a life well lived while using bad choices and regrets as a stepping stone to better days,” she said. “We are not human facts, we are human beings, here to be present every day so that our spirit can live a human existence.”

One day, Breadner hopes to build a spiritual community in Bradford for people to connect on a deeper level.

“We must learn to rebuild our spiritual bonds,” she said. “My book is made up of 52 chapters of my exploration of spirituality and what it means to be spiritually connected to the people in your life, to nature, or to your practice. And to build spiritual community, we need to come out of isolation .”

In stillness is available for purchase on line at Friesenpress, Amazon and Indigo, as well as in-store at Bradford health food store Nancy’s Nifty Nook.

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The Cardiff Philharmonic Orchestra prepares for the 40th anniversary concert https://hellven.org/the-cardiff-philharmonic-orchestra-prepares-for-the-40th-anniversary-concert/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:03:07 +0000 https://hellven.org/the-cardiff-philharmonic-orchestra-prepares-for-the-40th-anniversary-concert/ //= do_shortcode(‘[in-content-square]’) ?> Cardiff Philharmonic Orchestra Pierre Collins Michael Bell, founder and conductor of the Cardiff Philharmonic Orchestra, looked remarkably calm and serene as we began our telephone interview on the 40th anniversary of his group of amateur musicians. I was expecting it to be perhaps a bit disheveled, given the twists of fate in […]]]>
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Cardiff Philharmonic Orchestra

Pierre Collins

Michael Bell, founder and conductor of the Cardiff Philharmonic Orchestra, looked remarkably calm and serene as we began our telephone interview on the 40th anniversary of his group of amateur musicians.

I was expecting it to be perhaps a bit disheveled, given the twists of fate in the run-up to the orchestra’s special celebration at its spiritual home, St David’s Hall, Cardiff, on Friday 24th June . But no. It was as serene as a Mozart adagio.

The orchestra had planned the anniversary concert in the hall on June 18. But the postponed Stereophonics concert and the resulting disruption in the city center forced its cancellation. Fortunately, June 24 has become available.

Everything seemed to be back on track until talented pianist Martin James Bartlett, who was to play Gershwin’s Piano Concerto at the concert, was forced to withdraw at almost the eleventh hour due to illness.

With the help of the Young Classical Artists Trust, Mr. Bell was able to engage the brilliant 22-year-old Italian pianist, Gabriele Strata, to play the concerto at the concert.

“We hired Martin James Bartlett over a year ago,” Bell said. “Then he had to withdraw. Well, these things happen. The show must continue.”

Spontaneity and enthusiasm

Mr Bell, who received the MBE in 2018 for his services to the orchestra, said: “We will only see Gabriele the day before the concert. There will then be a full rehearsal and another rehearsal during the day.

“We have done everything before. We all know the part, so just put the two halves together.

“There will be a lot of spontaneity and excitement, that’s how it should be. We’ll all be on our metal. It’s always a challenge, but also a great joy for us and hopefully for the public.

Mr Bell, who graduated from Cardiff University School of Music in 1981, formed the orchestra in March the following year, bringing together former music students who wanted to play the music they loved.

The first concert was at St David’s Cathedral in Cardiff on June 19, before St David’s Hall even opened.

“We thought it would be a one-off gig,” Bell recalled. “Then we said we would do one more, then one more and just one more. We kept doing one more and now we’ve done about 400 shows.

Large repertoire

The orchestra has a wide repertoire and is not afraid to tackle difficult works like Mahler’s First and Second Symphonies, Richard Strauss’s Alpine Symphony, Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, as well as works by Shostakovich .

He has also given world premieres, including Mr Dahl, by Welsh composer Bernard Kane. It was narrated by Newport-born Hollywood actor Micheal Sheen.

The orchestra has also worked with Sir Bryn Terfel and Sir Karl Jenkins.

Although St David’s Hall is the orchestra’s “spiritual home”, where it gives four concerts a year, it has performed in venues in Zurich and Nantes, as well as the Salle Pleyet, the first venue concert in Paris.

He also performed in that town’s imposing Eglise de la Madeline, where Faure’s Requem was first performed. The orchestra also performs at the Miners Institute in Blackwood.

Mr Bell, who never took a conducting course but honed his skills by observing Sir Adrian Boult and other great conductors, said the orchestra’s main strength was that he attracted amateur musicians from all walks of life and from all walks of life. economic circles.

“We have members of all ages and professions, including teachers, those working in industry and office workers,” said Mr Bell, who has spent his working life in council administration. from Cardiff.

“We meet every Friday night to rehearse at the Bishop of Llandaff School Hall. It’s always a lot of fun and very rewarding.

“We like to stretch, play stimulating repertoire as well as lighter music. Our regular Night at the Movies concerts are always popular with the public.

International attention

In addition to Gershwin’s Piano Concerto, Friday’s anniversary concert will include Rachmaninoff’s imposing Symphony No. 2 and a work by Welsh composer Gareth Wood entitled Cardiff Bay Overture.

Mr Bell said: “The opening is ideal for our anniversary concert. It is a living reflection of the industrial and cultural history of Cardiff Bay.

The orchestra recently attracted international attention and some criticism after dropping a Russian music program in light of the war in Ukraine. It was another interesting episode in the orchestra’s 40-year history.

“We did it with the best of intentions and we didn’t expect him to develop the way he did. It was the right thing to do at the time but, of course, we include Russian music in future programs.

Mr Bell, who is also Music Director of the Abergavenny Symphony Orchestra and conducts Brecknock Sinfonia and Hereford Symphony Orchestra, was optimistic about the future of classical music in Cardiff and beyond.

“We hope to continue to provide varied programs that we and the public will enjoy,” Bell said. “It is encouraging that we are attaching young musicians who will ensure that the orchestra is fresh and dynamic.”

Here comes the next 40 years!


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KCK parish develops its communion of saints https://hellven.org/kck-parish-develops-its-communion-of-saints/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 05:11:58 +0000 https://hellven.org/kck-parish-develops-its-communion-of-saints/ Paul Helmer, architect and color consultant with Touch of Distinction Color and Design in Kansas City, Missouri, speaks with All Saints’ Day pastor Father Peter Jaramillo, SSA, about the St. Juan Diego portion of the mural at the summit of Toussaint. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE by Joe Bolligjoe.bollig@theleaven.org KANSAS CITY, Kan. – There is […]]]>
Paul Helmer, architect and color consultant with Touch of Distinction Color and Design in Kansas City, Missouri, speaks with All Saints’ Day pastor Father Peter Jaramillo, SSA, about the St. Juan Diego portion of the mural at the summit of Toussaint. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE

by Joe Bollig
joe.bollig@theleaven.org

KANSAS CITY, Kan. – There is a thrilling scene in the book of Revelation where Saint John recounts a marvelous sight of the saints in heaven:

“After this I had a vision of a great multitude, which no one could number, from every nation, race, people and tongue. They stood before the throne and before the Lamb, dressed in white robes and holding palms in their hands” (7:9).

Parishioners of All Saints Church in Kansas City, Kansas will see their own version of St. John’s vision around July 10 when the scaffolding comes down and the results of their project to paint the interior of the church are revealed. in all its glory. Construction started on April 1.

Paul Helmer, architect and color consultant at Touch of Distinction Color and Design in Kansas City, Missouri, performs retouching on the image of the Holy Spirit. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE

Before, the walls and ceiling were pure, bare white. Today parts of the church have been brightened up with rich hues including metallic gold, burgundy and blue.

The square spaces of the ceiling of the nave, from the chancel to the apse, have been filled with large stylized dogwood blossoms. The ceiling of the apse depicts, against a blue background, a multitude of saints in heaven with 12 saints standing out widely in front of the multitude. Above them all hovers the Holy Spirit.

Twelve saints were chosen for special treatment because they are the saints for whom the local community has a special devotion, said the parish priest of All Saints and Sainte-Marie-St. Parishes Anthony Father Peter Jaramillo, SSA. They reflect the rich history and present-day ethnic diversity of what was known as the “Polish Hill” for much of the 20th century.

Originally it was St. Joseph’s Church, built by Polish immigrants. The new name was born after a series of parish consolidations.

The saints who dominate the ceiling of the apse are Sts. Cyril and Methodius, Saint Teresa of Calcutta, Saint John Paul II, Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, Saint Benedict, Saint Faustina Kowalska, Saint Juan Diego, Saint Maximilian Kolbe, Saint Oscar Romero, Saint Josephine Bakhita and Saint José Luis Sanchez del Rio.

Artist Phelipe Linstrom of Linstrom Pro Painters displays the image of Saint Maximilian Kolbe which he uses as a guide for the mural he paints on the ceiling of All Saints Church in Kansas City, Kansas. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE

The century-old church needed cleaning and renovation, but that was not the only reason for the project, Fr Peter said.

“It was born out of a desire to cleanse and renew our church after the pandemic, an opportunity to reintegrate people into the community after all the struggles and depression of the pandemic,” he said. “There were also spiritual concerns and people leaving and not coming back.

“So we came up with a plan to renew the spirit, and part of the renewal of the spirit was to bring back a welcoming community by cleaning up the church. It is a beautiful church and always has been. some attention.

Paul Helmer steps back to take a look at the new mural of saints at All Saints Church. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE

Fortunately, the parish had unused beautification funds. These and other funds raised by parishioners “purchasing” a dogwood blossom or saint paid for the cost of approximately $190,000.

For the project, Father Peter turned to two men who had previously worked at St. Mary-St. parish of Anthony. They are Paul Helmer, architect and color consultant at Touch of Distinction Color and Design of Kansas City, Missouri, and Phelipe Linstrom of Linstrom Pro Painters of Sugar Creek, Missouri. The other members of the team are Peyton Alexander and Danny Bardwell.

This would be the third project Helmer and Linstrom have done together.

“The church is uniquely beautiful with all this great architecture,” said Helmer, a Guardian Angels parish member in Kansas City, Missouri. “The interior is quite spectacular. “We decided that, to do the ceiling, we chose colors that were already on the side walls. Blue is a predominant color. Burgundy, and all the colors we used , are liturgical colors.

Paul Helmer shows part of the Altar of All Saints to Pastor Father Peter Jaramillo. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE

The dogwood flower on the nave ceiling was chosen for its spiritual significance. There is a legend that dogwood was used for the cross of Christ. Jesus, sensing the tree’s distress, transformed the dogwood species so that it would never again be used for crucifixion.

In addition to the saints in the apse and the nave ceiling, Helmer and Linstrom painted the walls behind the side altars and the (rear) altarpiece of the pre-Vatican II high altar, for added contrast and beauty. The tarnished filigrees of the high altar and reredos have been re-gilded to give them a warm, golden hue as when new.

“Father Peter was the leader of this project,” said Linstrom, who is a Lutheran.

“When you do something like that, there are a lot of emotions involved,” Linstrom said. “There are a lot of people who have opinions about what needs to happen, and it’s hard to make those compromises, so it will work for everyone.

“God bless Father Peter and his leaders. He visits us daily and he always blesses us and prays for our ability to do God’s work here. Without his support, this could not have happened. He was at the origin of our spiritual journey to make this project a reality.

Paul Helmer and Father Peter Jaramillo stand atop the scaffolding inside All Saints. LEAVEN PHOTO BY KATHRYN WHITE

This part is the first phase, said Father Peter. The parish will carry out phase two – painting the rest of the church – when sufficient funds have been raised.

“The joy of that for a pastor is creating something beautiful,” he continued. “So many times we have to invest parishioners’ money in things like retaining walls, sewer lines, furnaces and boilers. You rarely have the opportunity to do something like this.

“My hope is that by beautifying All Saints Church, it will bring about a renewal of people willing to support our parish.”

“We live in a generally poorer community,” added Father Peter, “but we can have beauty. We can enjoy the splendor of these old churches which express so much beauty and love of the faith tradition. These local immigrant churches contain so much history and splendor of art that speaks to the soul.

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Reverend Anna Scott found her calling just in time | Western Colorado https://hellven.org/reverend-anna-scott-found-her-calling-just-in-time-western-colorado/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 06:07:03 +0000 https://hellven.org/reverend-anna-scott-found-her-calling-just-in-time-western-colorado/ Photos by MCKENZIE LANGE/The Daily Sentinel Reverend Anna Scott reflects on her past life of drug and alcohol addiction before heading to the Center for Spiritual Living, which meets at the temporary location of Koinonia Church at 25 Road. “This place saved my life,” she says, adding that she was drawn to the sense of […]]]>






Photos by MCKENZIE LANGE/The Daily Sentinel

Reverend Anna Scott reflects on her past life of drug and alcohol addiction before heading to the Center for Spiritual Living, which meets at the temporary location of Koinonia Church at 25 Road. “This place saved my life,” she says, adding that she was drawn to the sense of belonging, the feeling that she had something to offer.




JThe thing Anna Scott remembers about meth is that it made her teeth soft.

“I don’t know what it really is, something about what this chemical does, but it makes your teeth soft. A lot of people who use meth don’t have teeth, but I remember my teeth would be soft, like spongy. Interesting, isn’t it?

Scott, now in her 60s and a reverend of the Center for Spiritual Living in Grand Junction, is grateful to have quit the life of drugs while she still had her teeth.

It’s been a long journey for Scott, who was addicted to drugs and alcohol for about 10 years before finding the church in the early 1990s. She was officially ordained a minister on March 25.

“It didn’t start every day, but it ended every day. It started with partying, like maybe a Friday night or something. Then the meds took over,” Scott said.

After that, Scott says, she didn’t really go out and party because she was too busy doing drugs at home.

One night in the early 1990s, Scott was hanging out at a downtown bar. A Wednesday night regular named Dave kept asking him to go to his church, and Scott finally relented, attending a candlelight service on Christmas Eve.

“When I went to this service, I knew I would come back,” she said. “I could just see a peace in these people and just a light, the way the atmosphere, the energy…, I knew I would be back.”

She started coming regularly, but worked hard not to draw attention to herself.

“I had a mode of operation. What I would do is I would wait until the service started, and I would come in, sit in the back, and just as they started to sing the closing song, I would run out.

“I didn’t feel worthy and it was uncomfortable for me to kiss these people I didn’t know. And it’s a group of people hugging each other,” Scott said.







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Reverend Anna Scott of the Center for Spiritual Living is silhouetted against a stained glass window. She says the center practices the science of the mind, which is more of a philosophy than a religion. It also teaches members to take responsibility for their lives, Scott says.




As she continued to attend and became more comfortable, Scott began working on the duplicating machine for Sunday services.

“It was good for me because I felt like I was contributing. So it was really good. It was important, at the time, to me,” she said.

Then she started singing with the choir.

“The way I did it, I have a good ear for pitch, and the lady I sang with had a nice pitch, so I would just lean over to her and get the pitch, so I could do it,” Scott said.

Bonding with the women in the choir was a big step, Scott said.

“Drugs ended up being my main problem, and coming off drugs you don’t really feel good or think about it clearly, so I worked on that,” Scott said. “But it was great to feel useful, it was great to know that I could still read and understand things after trying to fry my brain.”

“So yeah, little by little, I got more and more involved.”

“When I was young and fresh in this field, I was drinking all this interesting stuff and there were courses that the only thing I hadn’t taken was practitioner training, and I thought I probably wouldn’t be a practitioner, but once I got through that, I looked back on my life and…this place saved my life,” Scott said.

“When I first came here, I had just come out of a long addiction to drugs, meth, you know, and alcohol, all that. So, not really having such a great quality of life, I decided because of what this center had done for me, that I wanted to give back. If I could be able to help someone in this situation, I wanted to.

Scott became a practitioner, which is a sort of spiritual advisor, and continued for about 17 years. All the while, people were asking him to become a minister.







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A sash worn by the reverend shows symbols of various religions to signify unity at the Center for Spiritual Life.




“I thought, oh no, people like me don’t become ministers,” Scott said.

During this time, Scott was healing from much of the pain that had led her to drink and take drugs, and as a practitioner she said she wanted to help others.

“Interestingly, once I got into ministerial school, a lot of people who are ministers have had lives, and sometimes not so nice ones,” Scott said.

It took the breakdown of a long-term relationship and a friend asking if there was something on her mind that she had always wanted to do that inspired Scott to enter ministerial school.

The Center for Spiritual Living, temporarily located at Koinonia Church on 25 Road, raised funds so Scott could attend school in Denver. She had considered selling her house to pay for it before that.

“Ooh, I’m glad that didn’t happen. Now that house is worth three times what it was then,” Scott said.

The first time Scott drove to Denver for school, she cried the whole way, then she cried during the first class.

“I couldn’t believe what I was doing,” she said.

Scott worked full-time as the manager of a C&F convenience store and was a churchgoer while attending ministerial school.

The school taught him many practical things, such as how to set up finances, how to work with people, how to counsel people and how to give a speech/sermon, as well as the study of different religions.

“My favorite classes were those on quantum physics and how it relates to our philosophy,” Scott said. “I thought if I was younger I would like to go back to school and become a quantum physicist.”

Scott served as assistant minister for three years, and when the minister left, the Center for Spiritual Living began looking for a new minister, which eventually landed on Scott.







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MCKENZIE LANGE

Reverend Anna Scott smiles as she recounts how she found herself a part of the Center for Spiritual Life, and later, the Center for Spiritual Life, in Koinonia, where their services are held, Tuesday, May 3.




Scott’s ordination had to be postponed several times by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It was more than I could have imagined; it was such a loving experience,” Scott said.

The Center for Spiritual Living practices the science of the spirit, which Scott says is more of a philosophy than a religion.

Science of Mind is part of the religious science movement based on the notion that every human being is an expression of God.

“It’s about realizing that there really is no separation between God and us, between you and me. There is one spirit of God; there is a spirit of life.

One thing Science of Mind teaches is to take personal responsibility for our lives, Scott said.

“You can imagine this was a delightful idea for me as I came off my med break,” Scott said.

Another thing the center practices is inclusion.

“The Center for Spiritual Living Grand Junction is a diverse, radically inclusive, and out-of-the-ordinary church. We provide a great place for “the rest of us” who are looking to connect with God/the higher power/universal presence, but don’t really fit into any particular religion. Although we celebrate centuries-old spiritual traditions from around the world, our message and delivery is modern and down to earth. So relax, have fun and look around – chances are you’ll see people like you,” reads a message on the centre’s website.

“I felt like I was being discriminated against,” said Scott, who is gay. “Especially when I was younger. These days, either I’m with people who don’t care, or it’s not so bad anymore, I don’t know.

“I want everyone to be treated the same, I want everyone to have a chance. That really motivates me.

Scott works with Together Colorado, a group of faith leaders who work on social justice actions.

“I think our philosophy has grown to the point where we see it’s our responsibility to say ‘this isn’t fair,'” Scott said.

Scott grew up in Nucla, but left at age 13 to move to Grand Junction. She attended Central High School and the former Western State College.

Scott returned to Nucla to teach at age 25, but it didn’t last long, in part because she found it a difficult environment for a gay person.

Scott thinks difficulty fitting in because she’s gay is part of what led her to do drugs and drink

“One of the hidden beliefs for me and the drug was wanting to fit in, like I wanted to fit in with these people,” Scott said. “It seems so gross now. I had a good time, I liked the people, it’s this co-dependent stuff. So the false belief for me was that I wasn’t acceptable, that I wasn’t I didn’t belong, that I was gay and addicted to drugs. But I don’t have to stay like that. I mean I’m probably going to have to stay gay, I think. If this is a phase, it lasted 44 years.

Scott never thought about eventually becoming the person to lead the service when she started attending church in the early 90s.

“Most of the time I remember the energy and the feeling in that room and the way people were with each other,” she said. “At the beginning, that was what I was looking for, it was inner peace. I was not at peace with myself.

When Scott first walked into the church, she said, she was drawn to the sense of belonging, the feeling that she had something to offer.

“I needed to fit in somewhere that wasn’t a bar,” Scott said. “It’s really wonderful after feeling like a burden on society.”

“We always have a choice and God is always there to support us. And that we can change for the better,” she said.

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The view from the top of the mountain? A nation of indoor cats https://hellven.org/the-view-from-the-top-of-the-mountain-a-nation-of-indoor-cats/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:11:21 +0000 https://hellven.org/the-view-from-the-top-of-the-mountain-a-nation-of-indoor-cats/ Published: 06/10/2022 16:02:19 Modified: 06/10/2022 16:00:12 Crystal balls can be a fuzzy way to see the future, but the events of the past two years predict our medium-term future: there is no “new normal” because there is no everything until the world-shaking tectonic shifts set in. The repercussions of COVID, Putin’s war on Ukraine and […]]]>

Published: 06/10/2022 16:02:19

Modified: 06/10/2022 16:00:12

Crystal balls can be a fuzzy way to see the future, but the events of the past two years predict our medium-term future: there is no “new normal” because there is no everything until the world-shaking tectonic shifts set in.

The repercussions of COVID, Putin’s war on Ukraine and Trump/MAGA will take years to unwind, possibly a decade or more. Until then, we will be walking on new, rickety, treacherous and, above all, unknown ground to us. This is the age of uncertainty.

An infectious disease is still disrupting life and the global supply chain that has been bent by COVID could be shattered by the war in Ukraine. We have seen the warnings and are just waiting for the empty shelves and long lines to come.

The chaos of politics at home will plunge us into a decline that will also take years to – to what? Repair from? Change? Die of?

But this electoral chaos and wafer-thin majorities in DC for any hope of good governance will weaken us to the point of no return. Our future will be like the UK after World War II. In 1945 the sun still did not set on the British Empire, but by 1948 dusk had fallen and it was 40 years or more before the UK saw a new dawn.

There will be no sudden collapse, but a long slide into whatever comes next because clearly the times, era, epoch, paradigm or worm have changed, ended , expired, moved or rotated.

There is no new normal as in some kind of balance, but rather a flurry of events in search of a new balance. And there are going to be a lot of spills on the sides, as it already is.

It seems that all the old “dogmas of the past” have fallen. Liberalism as a universal ideal is dead – it gave us globalism and an entrenched parasite, One Percent. Socialism – at least in America – cannot govern nor attain sufficient political power to influence future events. Moreover, our socialists of “exceptional” America do not even accept that the American working class be their main constituency! It’s more like a club: anyone can join but you have to approve membership first.

Hence the “performative” character of politics today. A prime example is the MAGA contestant in Georgia this week who was nobody until she got on a bus and painted “Jesus/Guns/Babies” on the side and drove through Georgia being so crazy and childish that she wanted it. Precisely because after getting around 4% of the vote, she shouted “robbed in the election” and is now a rising MAGA star who can turn on the money taps and start cashing in. Because she won? Nope! Because she ran like a moron, lost and cried foul. That is to say, she ran to lose, in order to join the “persecuted great mass” of MAGA followers.

This kind of spectacle is the kind of decadence that marks empires in decline. (Remember, before Obama and Trump, the left understood that the United States had a new type of empire since 1898 and therefore had to follow the decline of all empires.) There is a way to understand our dilemma . Martin Luther King Jr. predicted it in 1967: a nation that spends more on war than on its people risks “spiritual death”. And as his warning came over half a century ago, we must face the fact that we are spiritually dead, as a nation, as a people. You want to resist the idea, but you can’t turn away from it. We are not dead in the ‘I’ sense, but as in ‘we the people’, we are spiritually dead.

We have no history that binds, no ideology that unites us in understanding, no pact that merges us into one “unam”. Only a checklist of ‘yes’ and ‘no’s, a few high fives of self-congratulation before the left flies away like a whisper of starlings – thrilling to watch but the show is soon over. So, the Women’s March, glorious by the millions around the world, fell out over a question of Palestine? Isn’t it like a Monty Python sketch?

In addition to a spiritual death, technology has weakened us – rather than a mega-encyclopedia where all questions can be answered, social media has proven to be more like standing in front of a theater and handing out megaphones that don’t scream than “Fire!” – it’s going to be a lot of jostling. In fact, doesn’t it seem like we often do? Bum-rush the doors to get out, to kick someone out, to rush here and there.

Unsurprisingly, the metaphor that fits me best is that of novelist Dave Eggers who wrote that America “has become a nation of indoor cats” – declawed, chubby, pampered, but still convinced that “If that glass door Wasn’t there? Oh, you squirrels would be so dead! But the glass keeps the cat from hearing the squirrels laugh. And, how can you call a creature with claws, fangs, and the stuffed feet of a silent killer – trapped behind glass like in a terrarium – but spiritually dead?

We only have our self-esteem to console us. And even that does not come from within but from without. The scratching between the ears, the rubbing of the belly, the meals and treats that make us purr, are given by the hand of another. What happens when this hand withdraws such an affirmation? Cats could go wild, like we are now.

If there’s no real reason to hope, can we survive? Indeed we can, but not hopefully. What America and the left need is a sense of duty to our planet and our children. Duty means that we know what we must do, even if we have no hope of seeing it ourselves. We must recognize: we will not reach the top of the mountain, but we as a people will.

Joe Gannon, teacher and author, lives in Easthampton. He can be reached at opinion@gazette.net

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Weekly Numerological Predictions from June 6 to June 12, 2022 | Astrology https://hellven.org/weekly-numerological-predictions-from-june-6-to-june-12-2022-astrology/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 06:08:51 +0000 https://hellven.org/weekly-numerological-predictions-from-june-6-to-june-12-2022-astrology/ Number 1: (People born on the 1st, 10th, 19th and 28th of any month) Ganesha says there will be a slight positive change in planetary conditions this week. Having a complete plan before doing any work will prevent you from making mistakes. The younger class and students will be completely serious about their careers and […]]]>

Number 1: (People born on the 1st, 10th, 19th and 28th of any month)

Ganesha says there will be a slight positive change in planetary conditions this week. Having a complete plan before doing any work will prevent you from making mistakes. The younger class and students will be completely serious about their careers and studies. Your stubborn and skeptical nature can sometimes cause problems for others. It is also necessary to change its behavior over time. Do not pay attention to the negative aspects of the media. Despite the slowdown in trade, there will be a lucrative situation. Home arrangements will be properly maintained. Colds, rhythm and throat infections may persist.

Number 2: (People born on the 2nd, 11th, 20th and 29th of any month)

Ganesha says blocked payments can be found this week. So keep trying. Efforts to resolve family issues can be successful. An important task will also be successful with the help and guidance of a senior member. Stay away from people with negative activity. Only a close relative can cause your problem. Don’t spend extravagantly. The health of an elderly member of the household will be affected by stress. Do not be interested in doing a new job in business. The family atmosphere will be normal. People with conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes should be especially careful.

Number 3: (People born on dates 3, 12, 21 and 30 of any month)

Ganesha says there will be a serious conversation with a close relative on a particular matter. This will also have a positive result. If work related to the construction of the building is blocked, you can also make an important decision on this. There will be a state of doubt or despair in the mind due to any misunderstanding. Maintain consistency and patience in your thoughts. Take the challenge. Students pay attention to their studies. You have to work with understanding and foresight in the field. Husband and wife will maintain proper home arrangements by coordinating with each other. Fatigue and insomnia will be felt.

Number 4: (People born on the 4th, 13th, 22nd and 31st of any month)

Ganesha says time will pass in spiritual activities. So that there is innovation in your way of thinking. Helping others will bring you spiritual happiness. Personal work can also be resolved calmly. A situation can arise for no reason with a close relative. However, the fact could be revealed soon. When children have a problem, talk to someone with experience. Don’t invest too much in a business-related venture. Your partner will be home because of your spouse’s discomfort. Health will be fine.

Number 5: (People born on the 5th, 14th and 23rd of any month)

Ganesha says this week that the grazing planet is on your side. You will experience enormous confidence and self-confidence in yourself. Spend time in spiritual pursuits with a desire for peace of mind. The spirit will be a little disappointed to receive unpleasant news. Be patient. Sometimes discussing a problem can lead to significant success. Commercial activities can be carried out serenely. It is your responsibility to take care of family members as well as household chores. Health will be excellent.

Number 6: (People born on the 6th, 15th and 24th of any month)

Ganesha says that finishing the work according to his spirit will bring relief from the upheavals. The decision made on an important plan related to finances will have a positive effect. Conflicts may arise with siblings or a close relative over family issues. Put an experienced person in between. Instead of being angry, try to find a peaceful solution. Business activities will be normal. There will be love and a happy atmosphere in the family. Health will be fine.

Number 7 (People born on the 7th, 16th and 25th of any month)

Ganesha says misunderstandings with your loved ones will be removed. Sweetness can return to your relationship. Economic activities should improve. Appropriate time will also be devoted to religious activities. Making a hasty decision can be detrimental to you. Do not listen to anyone and believe in your own efficiency. Before lending someone money, decide when they will come back. In business, focus on increasing productivity as well as marketing exposure. The cooperative attitude of husband and wife towards each other will maintain happiness and discipline in the home. People who have blood pressure disease should not be careless.

Number 8: (People born on the 8th, 17th and 26th of any month)

Ganesha says to sit with family members and exchange ideas. Many issues will also be resolved. There will be interest in other areas besides your job. Suddenly, a few expenses may arise that cannot be deducted. Take the path of peace while doing any work at this time. Taking stress can make the situation worse. The trade situation will be a little favorable this week. There may be a dispute between husband and wife over a problem. Don’t waste too much time on outdoor activities.

Number 9: (People born on the 9th, 18th and 27th of any month)

Ganesha says this week the grazing planet is creating the right situation for you. Your deed will be appreciated in society and family. You will succeed in performing all tasks in an orderly manner and maintaining coordination. Use your energy positively. Anger and haste can interfere with your work. There is a detrimental situation in commerce these days. Family happiness and peace will be maintained. Excessive stress and negative thoughts can lead to low morale.


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As The Enneagram’s Popularity Soars, Having An Experienced Guide Is Essential https://hellven.org/as-the-enneagrams-popularity-soars-having-an-experienced-guide-is-essential/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 17:23:22 +0000 https://hellven.org/as-the-enneagrams-popularity-soars-having-an-experienced-guide-is-essential/ When Suzanne Stabile first encountered the Enneagram, it was through none less than a teacher, Richard Rohr. It was the early 1990s, and Suzanne and her husband, Joe, were looking for some sort of spiritual mentor. Joe, a former Roman Catholic priest turned Methodist minister, had benefited from having a spiritual director since he was […]]]>

When Suzanne Stabile first encountered the Enneagram, it was through none less than a teacher, Richard Rohr.

It was the early 1990s, and Suzanne and her husband, Joe, were looking for some sort of spiritual mentor. Joe, a former Roman Catholic priest turned Methodist minister, had benefited from having a spiritual director since he was a young seminary student, and he thought they could use guidance to discern the work God was giving them. So he took the plunge and called Rohr, a complete stranger, to ask if he and Suzanne could come visit.

This was the beginning of a long and beautiful friendship between Rohr and the Stabiles. In fact, she always checks with him before making any major decisions. It was also the beginning of Suzanne’s deep love for the Enneagram.

During this first meeting, Rohr gave her a manuscript of one of her books on the Enneagram, which she knew nothing about. “I think you might really like that,” he told her.

She took the book home and “devoured” it, as she explained to Religion News Service in a Zoom interview. At that time, there were few books available on the Enneagram, which has often been described as a personality typing system. Fascinated, she read “everything I could get my hands on” in the pre-Google days. Since most 20th century enneagram experts believed the system was best learned through oral tradition under the guidance of an experienced teacher, there was not much written material available.

When the Stabiles visited Rohr again three months later, she came armed with a list of questions.

He said to her, “It seems to me that you really understand this, organically and intuitively. I don’t know you very well yet, but one of your gifts seems to be synchronicity. I would suggest that you study this for five years before talking about it.

So that’s what she did: a deep dive into the Enneagram for five years before she taught a workshop. She used this time to observe people of the nine basic personality types and study everything that had been published on the subject.

“It made all the difference,” she said. Today, Stabile is one of the best Enneagram teachers in the world, and the landscape around him has changed dramatically. Information, once rare and transmitted mainly through oral teaching, is now ubiquitous in print and online. There are many Enneagram institutes, teachers, podcasts (Stabile is “The Enneagram Journey”), retreats and workshops.

Not to mention the books: Stabile recently published “The Journey to Wholenesswhich is the third book on the Enneagram she has authored or co-authored and published with InterVarsity Press.

Stabile views all three books as natural progressions for people new to the Enneagram and wanting to delve deeper.

“The Way Back to You” the 2016 bestseller which Stabile co-authored with Ian Morgan Cron, focuses on self-learning. This, she says, is the foundation for growth. “You have to know who you are and the lens through which you see the world,” Stabile explained. “And you have to recognize that you’ve always seen the world that way. And you can change what you do with your outlook, but you can’t change your outlook.

InterVarsity Press reports that it has sold 750,000 copies to date. (Disclosure: Jana Riess, the author of this article, was also the editor of this book.)

Stabile’s 2018 follow-up, “The Path Between Us: An Enneagram Journey to Healthy Relationships(100,000 copies sold), is about treating others the way they want to be treated – which, she points out, is not as simple as following the “golden rule”. says to treat others as you would like to be treated. Instead, “the Enneagram offers us the opportunity to treat others as they want to be treated.”

The next step in the wisdom journey, she says, is spiritual: learning how each personality type relates to God. “The Journey Toward Wholeness” distills his 30 years of study of the Enneagram, and in particular his insights into the Christian life.

Stabile says spiritual transformation is impossible until people recognize the darker parts of their personality. “The best part of you is also the worst part of you” is a phrase that comes up often in his teaching and podcast interviews. True transformation, she insists, is as much about letting go as it is about striving for something.

“In our Western culture, we have this temptation to believe that we have enough control to get rid of the worst part of us with enough willpower and discipline,” she said. “That’s not true. Transformation happens when something old falls away and we allow that to happen.

Given the current trend of the Enneagram, Stabile fears that some people will simply adopt it as a fad rather than a tool for change. Parts of his popularity are great; she is happy to see, for example, that the average age of participants in her workshops has fallen considerably in recent years. “My audience is no longer alike. Maybe 75% of the people in the room are under 40.

The downside is a certain superficiality. There’s a proliferation of Ennea memes, quick tests online, and even sites that promise to tell you which animal you’re most like, based on your Enneagram type.

Stabile admits that this worries her.

“Someone will recognize me on an airplane and then tell me their Enneagram type is a Four with a Nine Wing.” Which is an impossible configuration. Many of these people, she says, have taken a 10-question test online and think that’s enough to master the Enneagram.

True study takes time and commitment, and is best learned from a teacher. “I don’t support a test and I never have,” she said. “I’m clear with dear friend Russ Hudson that his is the best. But most indicators only measure the behavior and not the motivation for the behavior.

So Stabile continues to hit the road and record her podcast, her obvious energy for teaching seemingly undiminished by the fact that she’s now 70 and has earned the nickname “Godmother of the Enneagram.” Right now, she’s halfway through a multi-city speaking tour to promote “The Enneagram Journey,” including Friday and Saturday in her hometown of Dallas.

The tour’s next stops include Denver in July, where Pastor Nadia Bolz-Weber will join her for the event; Birmingham, Alabama; San Francisco; and other cities.

She hopes people will leave these workshops not only informed, but inspired to change. “The best witness is ‘has that made you a better human being?’ If you are, people will ask you why you have changed, why you are kinder and more at peace. If you do the job.

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Gun laws won’t solve a problem of culture and spirit – AMAC https://hellven.org/gun-laws-wont-solve-a-problem-of-culture-and-spirit-amac/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 14:01:08 +0000 https://hellven.org/gun-laws-wont-solve-a-problem-of-culture-and-spirit-amac/ Once again, the nation has witnessed a horrific and needless act of violence, in which innocent children are the victims. And again we hear from Liberals that the answer is gun control. If we look at what generally characterizes the mindset of those – usually young men – who commit […]]]>




Once again, the nation has witnessed a horrific and needless act of violence, in which innocent children are the victims.

And again we hear from Liberals that the answer is gun control.

If we look at what generally characterizes the mindset of those – usually young men – who commit these acts, we see what generally characterizes the mindset that has gripped our entire culture.

Victimhood, blame and denial of personal responsibility.

Could it be an accident?

Kudos to the Wall Street Journal for having the courage to point to these incidents as signs of a “social and spiritual” problem in the country. “The rise of family dysfunction and the decline of mediating institutions such as churches and social clubs have consequences.”

The signs of a sick society are all around us: the breakdown of the family, the collapse of interest in marriage and having children.

In 2021, 107,000 Americans died from drug overdoses, an all-time high and a 15% increase from the previous year.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the suicide rate in the United States increased by 35.2% between 1999 and 2018.

Suicide was the second leading cause of death among young people aged 10 to 34 and the fourth leading cause of death among those aged 34 to 44.

A common feature of suicides and mass killings is that the perpetrators are disproportionately male.

Men – usually young men – commit indiscriminate mass murder, and men commit suicide at a rate almost four times higher than women.

Thus men demonstrate in the most disagreeable way another truth which our liberal friends wish to deny. Men are different from women – not only in their physical constitution, but also in their spiritual and psychological constitution.

For some reason, our increasingly atheistic, materialistic, and morally empty culture seems to weigh particularly heavily on men.

Nick Eberstadt, a researcher at the American Enterprise Institute, looked at the recent phenomenon of prime-age men – aged 25 to 54 – leaving the workforce. These are men who have stopped working and are looking for work. The official label is NILF – not in the labor force.

According to Eberstadt, the total number of NILF men remained stable through the 1940s and 1950s at around 1 million. Then in the late 1960s, it exploded. There are now 7 million prime-age men who have withdrawn from the labor market.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, the male labor force participation rate—the percentage of working-age men in the labor force—was 86.2% in January 1950. As of April 2022, it was 68%.

Women’s labor force participation rate nearly doubled over the same period — from 33.4% in January 1950 to 56.7% in April 2022.

We have moved from a church-centered culture to a government-centered culture.

According to Gallup, in 1950 more than 70% of Americans belonged to a church. In 2020, it was 47%. Among those born between 1981 and 1996, it is 36%.

During the same period, the share of all levels of government in our GDP rose from 22.6% to 43.4%.

The sanctity of life was devalued with Roe v. Wade. Military conscription was abolished around the same time, erasing any personal responsibility, beyond paying taxes, that men must serve.

In this culture devoid of entitlement and meaninglessness, lost young men periodically make their presence known through violent expressions, sometimes directed at others, sometimes at themselves.

I don’t pretend it’s simple. I certainly agree that safety measures must be taken, especially in schools.

George Washington warned the nation in his farewell address that there is no freedom without faith, tradition and personal responsibility.

The same liberals who helped eliminate this now want more government in the way of new gun laws to solve what is a cultural and spiritual crisis.

Star Parker is president of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and host of the weekly television show “Cure America with Star Parker.”

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A Catholic priest founded the world’s first psychiatric hospital https://hellven.org/a-catholic-priest-founded-the-worlds-first-psychiatric-hospital/ Mon, 30 May 2022 13:35:33 +0000 https://hellven.org/a-catholic-priest-founded-the-worlds-first-psychiatric-hospital/ Pr. Joan Gilabert Jofré rescued a mental patient from bullies and then founded the “Hospital of the Innocents”. A Catholic priest founded the world’s first psychiatric hospital. Surprised? We shouldn’t be. This is just one of the many contributions the Church has made to humanity that most people are unaware of, even Catholics. It was […]]]>

Pr. Joan Gilabert Jofré rescued a mental patient from bullies and then founded the “Hospital of the Innocents”.

A Catholic priest founded the world’s first psychiatric hospital. Surprised? We shouldn’t be. This is just one of the many contributions the Church has made to humanity that most people are unaware of, even Catholics.

It was Friday, February 24, 1409. Fr. Joan Gilabert Jofré was leaving the convent of Plaza de la Merced, in Valencia, Spain. On his way to the cathedral, near St. Catherine’s Church, he saw a group of young men taunting and assaulting a man. Shouting, they called him “Crazy, crazy!”

In fact, it was obvious that it was a mentally ill man. The priest courageously repelled the attackers, protected the poor man and took him to the Mercedarian residence.

Pr. Jofré himself was a mercédaire friar, that is to say a priest belonging to the Order of Mercy, in which he had entered in 1370.

The Mercedarians and Our Lady of Mercy

The mercedaries still exist today and the community is over 800 years old. The order was founded on August 10, 1218 in Barcelona. In addition to the traditional vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, its members took a fourth vow: to devote their lives so completely to freeing slaves that they would even trade places with captives who were in danger of losing their faith – or if the order had no money to buy their release.

One of the best known Mercedarians is the founder, St. Peter Nolasco. He was a great liberator of Christians who were kidnapped by Muslims and taken as slaves to North Africa. The saint even sold the heritage he had inherited from his family to organize rescue expeditions. When he ran out of resources, he started begging for alms and donations. When he also ran out of alms and donations, St. Peter Nolasco pleaded with God for a miracle. It was then that he received an apparition from Our Lady, who asked him to found a congregation dedicated to the rescue of slaves. This is the origin of both the Order of Mercy and the devotion to Our Lady of Mercy.

The first psychiatric hospital

It was at the Mercedarian residence that Fr. Jofré lodged this poor man who was harassed because of his mental disorders. From then on, Jofré began to promote not only charity towards the mentally ill, but also the creation of a specific hospital for them.

Pope Benedict XIII learned of the initiative and authorized the works by the bull of May 16, 1410. The hospital was placed under the spiritual patronage of the Virgin Mary under the title of Our Lady of the Innocents.

Things move quickly: on June 1, 1410, the Hospital of the Innocents is born to receive the mentally ill, the poor and abandoned children. The hospital chapel was dedicated to Our Lady of the Impotents. This first hospital in the world to offer care and residence to the mentally ill became the current University Hospital of Valencia.

Pr. Jofré spent a season carrying out evangelistic missions with Saint Vincent Ferrer. Shortly after returning to the monastery, he died on May 18, 1417. Despite several setbacks due to historical circumstances and not to the life of Fr. Jofré himself, his canonization process is underway but not forgotten.

THE DEPRESSION
WINTER
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Visiting Indian artist creates stone altar that sings of Jerusalem religions https://hellven.org/visiting-indian-artist-creates-stone-altar-that-sings-of-jerusalem-religions/ Sat, 28 May 2022 05:11:50 +0000 https://hellven.org/visiting-indian-artist-creates-stone-altar-that-sings-of-jerusalem-religions/ Jerusalem now has a temple shared by three religions. Created by a visiting Indian artist, it is located on the terrace of Muslala, an urban rooftop site atop the iconic Clal building in the city center. The space, a wooden meditation structure originally built for Israel’s Midburn Festival and later moved to Muslala, is centered […]]]>

Jerusalem now has a temple shared by three religions. Created by a visiting Indian artist, it is located on the terrace of Muslala, an urban rooftop site atop the iconic Clal building in the city center.

The space, a wooden meditation structure originally built for Israel’s Midburn Festival and later moved to Muslala, is centered by a stone altar emitting soulful sounds and chants, harmonious chants and hymns , sung by religious leaders and teachers in Jerusalem.

Vibha Galhotra, who spent three months in Jerusalem as part of Jerusalem International Fellows, a 10-week residency program for artists, recorded each religious figure for her project and then constructed the round altar from slabs of stone of creamy Jerusalem, over the course of three days.

She calls it “From the mountain to the sea”. It’s a sort of playlist for open-source religion, where the guiding principle is open-mindedness. The built-in audio recorder inside the altar plays a continuous 45 minute loop of the sounds offered by Galhotra’s group of spirit guides.

“There has to be a point where everyone can all come together, for a common cause,” she said.

The common cause in this project, however, is not really religion. While the voices recorded are those of people preaching and teaching about religious subjects, they spoke to Galhotra about climate change and the environment, a common theme in her work as a visual artist.

Using sound for his work was a first for Galhotra, who does not speak the languages ​​of the various participants but found that their sounds and melodies conveyed their messages.

“I think we need to ask different kinds of questions,” she said. “Art gives me the power to ask simple questions.”

Galhotra spoke with more than a dozen religious thinkers and leaders, including Franciscan nuns, a friar of the Holy Sepulchre, a member of the Coptic church, a muezzin and an imam from a mosque in the old city, as well as a Jewish philosopher, a cantor and teachers.

Each religious representative was able to carefully select the music that represented him.

They were open to talking with Galhotra because she was asking about climate change, she noted.

“If I had asked about religion, it would be sticking my nose in their business,” Galhotra said. “The question was not offensive. It’s a question of sustainability.

So far, Galhotra said, her audience is responding, with people sitting for long periods listening to the sounds of “Mountain to the Sea” as they consider the messages inherent in the tones and songs.

“Mountain to the Sea” is in place at Muslala, which will hold a festival called Gag Eden (Roof of Eden) from June 6-9.

Guest artists Anna Lublina (second from right) and Vibha Galhotra (far right), members of the Jerusalem International Fellows at a trade show at Studio of Their Own in late March 2022 (Jessica Steinberg/Times of Israel)

Galhotra was one of five international Jerusalem Fellows, who are brought to the city each year to collaborate with artists, ensembles and cultural institutions in East and West Jerusalem.

His fellow artists were Claudia Lavista, a Mexican choreographer who worked with the Catamon dance troupe; Anna Lublina, a visual artist from the United States and Germany who held a workshop at the Bloomfield Science Museum on fabric and weaving; and Sofia Borges from San Paulo, Brazil, who taught visual arts at Ibdaa School of the Arts, a high school in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood.

Each of the fellows spent the 10 weeks meeting and working with local Jerusalemites, and held a salon about their process and findings toward the end of their stay.

“The goal is not to make the best work of art but to connect with Jerusalem’s cultural ecosystem,” said Elise Bernhardt, founder and director of Jerusalem International Fellows.

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